It’s all About the Iris

A bumble bee’s perspective of flowers (Iris) in our little English garden. The wind and heat has been hard on the flowers this season, so I thought I would preserve a moment in time for the delicate Iris bloom.

Video captured on a hand-held Garmin Virb Elite, edited/colour corrected in Davinci Resolve and Final Cut Pro X.

Screen Shot 2017-06-12 at 9.52.56 AM

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Emerging Beauty

Wascana Park in central Regina is a popular destination for both locals and tourists alike. There is just something exquisite about having a beautiful man-made lake in the middle of a major city on the prairies of western Canada.

Without a doubt, one of my favourite parks to cycle through, whether it be on a fixed-gear city bike, a road bike, or even a time trial bike enroute to the straight and flat highways east of Regina.

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Always a Victim, Never Victorious?

14361366_1157261507666174_762231491849836997_o
Custom Combining in Saskatchewan

This morning, as I was reading various American and Canadian news online, I could not help but notice the victim mentality of so many “news” articles. It would seem that a significant number of people in North America view themselves as helpless and weak, subject to being downtrodden by the rich and powerful, the elite of our respective societies.

To the perpetual victim, there is always an enemy, whether it be the wealthy, or corporations, or government. Always someone to blame for their lot in life, never once considering that they themselves are their own worst enemy. Often the victim is being victimized by their own thinking, interpreting life through the rose coloured lenses of their own worldview.

My grandfather once said,

If you can accept that life is unfair, then you have ALREADY won half the battle.

As an innovative and industrious farmer and businessman, he started his life in Canada with nothing and died in his late 90’s a wealthy man. There were no real breaks in his life, no significant government subsidies, no free rides. Make it or break it was a way of life for him. He fathered four sons, who in turn fathered their own children, and they, their children, and so forth. A family legacy was started by one man and one woman who were determined NOT to be victims, and to build a personal wealth that would be a blessing, not only to the generations of family yet to come, but to greater society as well.

The obvious question today is,

How much of our own victimization is the result of our own thoughts and choices in this life?

Even for those that have been truly victimized through violent crime, war, generational poverty, and failing health. There is a way out, and it starts by the way we view ourselves and life in general. It is going to take an enormous amount of courage and perseverance to climb out of the victim mentality so prevalent in today’s society. But it has to start somewhere, with one person willing to change the status quo of victimization and work towards a better future for their children’s children.

The choices we make today become who we are tomorrow

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Learning to Listen…

12742533_10153231783786786_8534304028282591041_n-2
The Prairie Crocus. A promise of Spring, a fresh new start.

Early this morning, as I was making a cup of coffee, I looked out my kitchen window and noticed a murder of America crows congregating amongst the trees. Even from across the street, I could see them tilt their heads towards the sky and their beaks begin to flap. Although I could not hear them from within the relatively soundproof isolation of our cosy kitchen,  I knew they must be making an awful racket, and probably have awakened some of my neighbours who often sleep with their bedroom windows slightly opened.

It was the kind of sound the majority of us do not want to hear, especially as the morning light was barely over the horizon. Yet, it was the harkening of Spring, the promise of warmth and sunshine. The foreshadowing of summer shirts, shorts, and sandals. The delightful sound of children playing in the streets of our Queen city. The hustle and bustle of the downtown streets, the beautiful women in their colourful spring dresses scurrying off somewhere. The handsome young men casually walking down the wide corridors of Scarth street, laughing and joking amongst each other, their sport coats  slung casually on their shoulders, as they slowly made their way down the street.

Magnificent are the sights and sounds of Spring, like an orchestra from the heavens playing the most beautiful and rare of classical music. Old Man Winter has vacated the premises, and life begins anew for another season, to bring fresh new beauty and joy to our hearts. Please come sit down on this little red park bench with me and let us listen together.

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

The Blur of Colour

A series of photographs taken at the Regina Floral Conservatory. The blending of predominantly pastel colours and the blurring effect was accomplished by the random movement of a hand-held camera with a slow shutter speed.

#LoveLife

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

A Debt of Gratitude

_dsc5215
Straw Jumper: Running the line of hay bales

Between the years of 1891–1914, approximately 170,000 people of Ukrainian heritage immigrated to Canada. Roughly 30 percent of those immigrants settled in Saskatchewan. The Ukrainian agriculturists were attracted to Canada by the promise of free land: homesteads of 160 acres.

Sadly, because of cultural differences including language, customs, manner of dress, etc., the new immigrants were not always treated well in their new country of choice.

Fast forward to 2016, and we see the positive results of that early immigration of the Ukrainian people. Those early settlers, along with many other European immigrants, built up our nation to what it is today. They were salt-of-the-earth, hard working contributors to our great nation and we owe a debt of gratitude to them. Let us, as Canadians, celebrate the achievements of those who worked so hard to provide this generation with the abundance that we possess as citizens of our nation.

http://esask.uregina.ca/entry/ukrainian_settlements.html

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.